Monday, January 26, 2015

Cabbage...Says It All

In the olden days, one ate cabbage, turnips, and sweet potatoes in the fall and winter. You had no choice. You ate it or you went hungry.

Well, children nowadays have everything. They get peaches, lettuce, watermelon and everything else all year long. Don't get me wrong; I am all for progress. But does there come a time when progress is no longer progress? I say let's eat a few root vegetables and cool season crops this winter. They are usually inexpensive, low in calories, a good source of fiber, vitamins A, C and folate. They are just plain good for you, so eat up.

To help your winter vegetables go down a little easier, I am offering up a recipe for creamed cabbage. I told one of my colleagues that the only way my mother prepared cabbage was with pork fat. Her response was, "Well, I'd add some of that too". I left it out, but feel free to add bacon if you like.

Creamed Cabbage

Serves 4 to 6.

Ingredients:

1 medium green cabbage, cored and thinly sliced
1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 Tablespoon grated ginger, heaping
2 Tablespoons butter
3/4 cup heavy cream
Salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:

1.  In a large skillet, heat the butter over medium heat until it melts and starts to bubble. Add onion and cook until translucent, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook for an additional minute. Stir in ginger and cook for another minute.

2. Add cabbage and stir to coat cabbage with butter. Cover with a tight-fitting lid. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 15 to 20 minutes, until cabbage has softened and slightly browned.

3. Reduce heat and stir in cream. Scrape up any browned bits from bottom of the pan. Cover an cook on low for about 10 minutes. Remove the lid, taste for salt and pepper. Cook until most of the liquid has evaporated and cabbage is coated with cream.


Monday, January 12, 2015

A New Year, A New Start

I've been writing about starting to cook for quite some time. So far, I'm just short of preaching. I don't mean to nag. But I believe there is value in preparing one's food at home. Food is communal. We create memories in the kitchen. A lot of our lives revolve around the kitchen. 

For me cooking is creating. I like knowing that I can make something. And I do enjoy it when people like something I cook. I cook for my enjoyment and for the enjoyment of those I feed. All my dishes are not masterpieces or works of art. Sometimes I just need to get dinner on the table. So I have a few things like eggs and pasta that I frequently fall back on.

Convenience ingredients are great for getting meals on the table. Try rotisserie chicken, bagged salads, frozen vegetables (without sauce), canned beans, fresh pasta, and pre-made pizza dough.

If you need a scientific reason to cook, here's one. According to a paper published in Public Health Nutrition, adults who cooked dinner 0 - 1 times per week consumed 2300 calories on an average day. Those cooking 6 - 7 times per week consumed 2163 calories on an average day. While that is only 136 calories, multiply 136 calories by 365 days. Get the picture?

Here is my recipe to help you get started. It is a Stromboli.   A Stromboli is an Italian-American sandwich of pizza dough wrapped various fillings. I chose spinach, onions, ham and cheese. 

Spinach and Ham Stromboli

Serves 4.


Ingredients:

½ medium onion, chopped
Olive or vegetable oil
4 ounces deli ham
1 package (16 ounce) frozen chopped spinach
6 ounces grated cheese, about 1½ cups
1 container (13.8 ounce) refrigerated whole wheat pizza dough
Pizza sauce

Directions:

1.  Heat about one tablespoon of oil in a medium skillet. Add onion and cook until translucent, about 5 minutes.
2.  Remove onion and set aside. Add ham to skillet. Cook until ham has dried out and begins to brown. Remove from skillet and set aside.
3. Add another tablespoon of oil to skillet. When oil is hot, add spinach. Cook until spinach until most of the water has evaporated. Set aside.
4.  Coat a work surface lightly with flour. Unroll dough onto floured surface.  Roll dough into a rectangle, about 11 X 14-inches.
5. Brush dough with oil. Top with cheese to within one inch of the edge.  Add onions, ham and spinach.
6. Roll dough up jellyroll fashion. Place bottom of dough on cookie sheet. Brush top of dough with oil. Bake at 400°F until crust browns, about 20 to 30 minutes. Cool for 10 minutes. Slice into 1-inch slices. Serve with pizza sauce.

Note: Onions, ham, and spinach can be cooked in advance (one to two days) and refrigerated until ready to use.


Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Get Cookin'

Yes, Get Cookin'. This is campaign from the American Diabetes Association. Now I have been saying this for quite some time, but for fun. Now, we have a health reason to do it.

November is American Diabetes Month - a time to come together and raise awareness of this ever-growing epidemic that is facing our nation. And what better time to start thinking about how you can cook healthy and tasty meals, and get moving - to Stop Diabetes®.

Choosing a healthy lifestyle is one of the most important things you can do to manage or prevent diabetes. That’s why, all month long, we are asking America to get cooking to Stop Diabetes.
 
For additional help on cooking to Stop Diabetes check out  American Diabetes Association.
 
For my cooking efforts this month, I chose a new cook book - Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day by Leanne Brown.
 
 I chose Spicy Green Beans. The recipe makes two servings, but can be easily doubled.

 Spicy Green Beans

Yields 2 Servings
Ingredients
 
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
½ pound green beans, ends trimmed, chopped into bite-size pieces
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sambal oelek (or 2 teaspoons chili flakes)
1 teaspoon ginger, grated
1 teaspoon lemon juice

Directions
1.  Add vegetable oil to a frying pan on medium heat. Once it’s hot, add the green beans. Cover and cook undisturbed for about 1 minute.
 
2.  In a small bowl combine garlic, soy sauce, sambal oelek, ginger, and lemon juice.
 
3.  The beans should have turned bright green. Add about ¼ cup of water to the pan. Cook another 2 minutes, until the water is mostly gone. Pour the sauce into the pan and toss gently to coat. Cook another 2 minutes, until everything is fragrant and most of the liquid is gone. Poke the beans with a fork: if it goes through easily, they are done. They should take about 5 minutes.
 4.      Taste and add more chili sauce or soy sauce if you want the beans hotter or saltier.
 Note: Sambal oelek is an Indonesian flavoring paste made from ground bird chilies, salt, oil and vinegar.
 
 

 

 
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Since July, five co-workers and I have been offering recipes and tips for using seasonal fruits and vegetables in our newsletters and blogs. This blog post contains a link to a survey to learn how you were able to use this information. 
 
 
Complete a short survey (5 - 10 minutes), and enter the drawing by clicking here.   
 
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Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Sweet Potatoes - Again

If you are even an occasional reader of this blog, you know I love sweet potatoes. I remember my mother baking them whole and we just ate them that way, no butter. I know it's hard to believe I would pass on butter.

Growing up, my father told stories of George Washington Carver and sweet potatoes. I also worked at Tuskegee University - on - you guessed it, sweet potatoes. So,you know sweet potatoes are near and dear to my heart.

In preparation for the fall brochure for local foods, my students made sweet potato pudding. I really did not think too much about it until - I ate it. It was delicious. So this is the recipe for sweet potato
pudding.


 
 

Sweet Potato Pudding

Serves 8.
 
Ingredients:
 
4 cups of cooked and mashed sweet potatoes
¾ cup sugar
2 eggs
2 Tablespoons butter, melted
½ cup coconut milk
1 Tablespoon lime juice, preferably fresh
Grated zest of one lime
¼ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ cup raisins
 
Directions:
 
1.  Bake or boil enough sweet potatoes to make 4 cups, mashed.
 
2. Add sugar and eggs to mashed sweet potatoes. Stir until thoroughly combined.
 
3.  Add butter, coconut milk, lime juice, zest, salt, baking powder, and cinnamon. Stir to combine. Stir in raisins.
 
4. Butter a 9-inch square pan. Pour mixture into prepared pan. Bake at 350°F for about 50 minutes. 


Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Tomato Salad - Kicked Up!

In addition to writing this blog, I also develop brochures for our local foods team.  I usually do about five brochures per year. I do two in the summer and one for each of the other seasons.


 
You might think eating locally in the Midwest is difficult, but it's not. Now, come fall and winter, a Midwesterner will be consuming root crops, kale, turnips, broccoli and beans. Dietitians recommend consuming a variety of foods and eating locally is one way to accomplish that. 

This recipe is one that I did for our local foods group. It stars locally grown tomatoes. Sometimes we just slice tomatoes, sprinkle with a little salt AND EAT! But at other times, we like to dress them up. Don't worry the tomatoes still shine through.


Tomato Salad with a Shallot Vinaigrette
 
Serves 6-8.

Ingredients:

3 Tablespoons minced shallots
3 Tablespoons red wine vinegar
½ teaspoon kosher salt plus more
½ teaspoon sugar
4 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
5 large ripe beefsteak type tomatoes, cut into ½-inch slices
2 Tablespoons capers, rinsed
Freshly ground black pepper
10 fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced

Directions:

1. Combine shallots, vinegar, ½ teaspoon salt, and sugar in a small bowl. Gradually whisk in oil to blend. Set vinaigrette aside.

2. Arrange tomatoes on a large platter. Sprinkle capers over; season with salt and pepper. Scatter basil on top. Whisk vinaigrette again; drizzle over salad. Serve immediately.

Monday, August 4, 2014

Gettin' By and Makin' Do

Some of us grew up in an era where you made do with what you had. You went without until you could afford it. You used it up and you wore it out! And it is that vein, that I am writing this blog.

In my refrigerator, I found an "empty" bottle of Dijon mustard. "Empty", meaning you can't get it all  without the addition of liquid. Enter vinegar, in this case, red wine vinegar.





I actually got the idea for using mustard in a salad dressing from the French. And you know, they got that food thing going on. The French often add mustard to salad dressings. If you to make something else with mustard, check out Serious Eats.

This is simple and it's a no recipe, recipe. Add a couple of tablespoons of vinegar to the mustard. Put the top on and shake it up. A kid will come in handy for this part. Once it's mixed, add a little olive oil, one or two tablespoons should do it. Add salt and freshly ground black pepper. You can also dress this up with parsley, chives, shallots, or not. You decide.  It's okay to store this in the refrigerator for a few days. Allow to come to room temperature before using.

I used my dressing on boiled potatoes. But don't be limited to potatoes, use green beans, green salad, asparagus. It would even be good a broiled salmon. Give it a try and you will never toss an "empty" mustard jar again.


Wednesday, July 23, 2014

You Asked for It!

Recently I posted this beautiful picture (if I must say so myself) on Facebook. Immediately, I got 'likes' and people wanted the recipe. Music to a foodie's ears. To all of my Facebook friends who 'liked' it and asked for a recipe, thank you and here's the recipe.

 
 
First of all, this is a recipe for chermoula (no we can't pronounce it either). Chermoula is a sauce of North African origins. After making it, I was reminded of a pesto, but with more oil. According to my resources, it is a marinade, or used to rub onto meats. I tried it on chicken and was impressed, along with my dining companions. I am looking forward to trying it on fish.
 
 
Chermoula

 
Makes 1½ cups.
 
Ingredients:
 
8 garlic cloves
½ cup parsley sprigs
cup cilantro sprigs
Grated zest of 2 lemons
4 teaspoons paprika
2 teaspoons chili powder
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 cup olive oil
 
Directions:
 
Combine the garlic, parsley, cilantro, lemon zest, paprika, chili powder, cumin, and salt in a blender or food processor. Puree mixture on low speed until you get a coarse puree; do not process until smooth. With the food processor running, add oil in a thin, steady stream. Blend until a thick paste forms.
 
Note: You may want to start with less olive oil.  You can always add more.  This mixture will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.
 

How I Used Chermoula

Firstly, I butterflied a chicken. I then rubbed the chicken with salt and pepper. After stirring the chermoula, I used about ½ cup to coat the chicken. I placed the chicken on a bed of sweet potatoes and red onions. You can use any vegetable to wish, Yukon gold or russets work well. I am thinking about trying winter squash next.
 
Preheat the oven to 450°F. Lay the chicken on the vegetables. Cook until the skin has started to brown, turn the oven done to 375°F and cook for another 10 minutes. Finally, turn to 350°F and cook until chicken reaches an internal temperature of 160°F.